News

Friday, March 02 2012

$1.8M in New Grants to Help Stabilize Homeless Families Statewide

We are pleased to announce $1.8 million in new Washington Families Fund (WFF) service grants to five nonprofit providers in Clark, Clallam, King, Snohomish, and Yakima counties.

familyThis is the second year in a row that Building Changes has focused its service funding on intensive program models that support the hardest to serve families with children and are designed to address issues that often lead to chronic homelessness. Many of these families have long-term involvement with child welfare or the criminal justice system or are struggling with substance abuse issues. Funding will ensure that families have access to case management, mental and physical health care, chemical dependency programs, and children's services. Providers leading these programs take a comprehensive team approach that often includes partnering with a network of supports in their communities.

“What’s significant about this year’s grant awards is that we’re going back to organizations that have demonstrated success and progress with these kinds of high-needs programs,” said Betsy Lieberman, Executive Director of Building Changes. “We’re supporting promising practices and the expansion of programs that work.”

Demonstrating program impact on family homelessness and expanding on what’s working has become increasingly important to Building Changes. To do this, we are prioritizing evaluation. By using an outside research and statistical survey organization to collect both program and family data, we will be able to assess impact on a much deeper and broader level. Findings will be reported in 2013.

To date, we have awarded service grants to 39 providers statewide through the Washington Families Fund. These providers have served nearly 1,800 families, including more than 3,000 children. With the addition of nearly 200 families helped by permanent supportive housing solutions through these expanded programs, Building Changes will be able to tell a more powerful story about the lessons we’re learning.

Washington Families Fund 2011 Awards:


Community Services Northwest
Award: $375,000
Project: Family Housing Northwest III
Five-year grant to support services for 10 high needs homeless families in Clark County, including case management, mental and physical health, chemical dependency, and domestic violence support. The project utilizes project-based Section 8 Vouchers from the Vancouver Housing Authority.

Serenity House of Clallam County

Award: $296,232
Project: Cornerstone Family Unification Project
Five-year grant to support services for 11 high needs homeless families in Clallam County, including case management, chemical dependency, child advocacy and cash assistance. The award will also be used to extend services for four units previously funded through the WFF High-Needs Family service model. The project utilizes Family Unification Program vouchers from the Peninsula Housing Authority.

Sound Mental Health

Award: $307,000
Project: Project Homestead II
Five-year grant to support services for 10 high needs homeless families in King County. This grant supports a comprehensive team providing services that include case management, mental and physical health, chemical dependency, and support for children.

Volunteers of America Western Washington
Award: $375,000
Project: Housing First for Chronically Homeless Families
Five-year grant to support services for 10 high needs homeless families in Snohomish County, including case management, mental health, chemical dependency, and support for children. The award will also be used to extend services for five units previously funded through the WFF High-Needs Family service model.

Yakima Neighborhood Health Services

Award: $375,000
Project: FIESTAS Youth and Family
Five-year grant to support services for 10 high needs homeless families in Yakima County. This grant supports an extensive network of service providers ensuring that families have access to case management, mental and physical health, chemical dependency, and children’s services. The project utilizes project-based Section 8 Vouchers from Yakima Housing Authority.